10 Steps to Make Time Management Work for You

The right techniques make time management work.

In the quest for better time management, we have been flooded with a large variety of gizmos, tools, and programs invented to help us more effectively manage our time. These tools and programs make great claims, but most fail to help us achieve that ultimate “nirvana” of time management that we desire.

Of all the time management “stuff” out there, I’ve found a few simple techniques that consistently work well, if implemented properly.

Here are 10 steps that, if followed, will ensure time-management works for you:

1. Kick the Habit: Like many poor habits, poor time management is a behavior that has been developed over time and the first step in “kicking the habit” is to recognize that you have a problem and then to make a firm commitment to do something about it.

2. Effective Planning: Similar to other disciplines, effective time management is a discipline that can be learned and mastered over time. The key principle to effective time management is planning. It’s been shown that for every minute you spend in planning, ten minutes is saved in execution.

3. Plan Each Day in Advance: The first step is to plan each day in advance. Whether you use a day planner, PDA device or electronic calendar, find the tool that works best for you. Sit down each night and carefully plan out your next day. Ask yourself: “What is the most important use of my time?” and “Where do I bring the greatest value to my organization?”

4. Develop your Daily Plan by Ranking Tasks: with the key tasks that must be accomplished (based on the answers to the two questions above). Once you have listed these vital tasks, then rank them accordingly (usually the ABCD method works well).

Planning your day the night before has other benefits as well. One key benefit is that you will sleep better, as your conscious mind can rest (because you’ve written down what must be accomplished and don’t have to worry about remembering every task). Your subconscious mind can then go to work on these issues while you sleep.

5. Block Scheduling: Next, look at your day as blocks of time put together. We call this Block Scheduling. Start with ‘hour’ blocks, then as you get more practice and become more proficient at budgeting your time, you will look at 30-minute blocks of time.

6. Mark Your Calendar with these Blocks of Time: Some of the most effective time managers look at their days in 15-minute increments. Take the ranked tasks from your list and insert them into the blocks of time on your calendar, starting with the most important task first.

7. Determine what time in the day you will set aside for each task: Morning time is usually the best time to tackle your most difficult and highest priority tasks. As the day wears on and you wear down, you can then work on the other tasks requiring less mental effort. Now you’re ready to begin your day.

8. Prioritize & Focus to reach Completion: Jump right in and begin on the most important, highest value task immediately.

Focus single-mindedly on starting and finishing this task and do not deviate from your plan. One of the biggest enemies of time management is the practice of starting several tasks but never finishing any of them.

A great prompting question to always ask yourself is, “Is this the most important thing I should be doing right here, right now?” Another key to successful Block Scheduling is not getting “derailed” from your plan.  Learn to delegate routine and time consuming, but vital tasks.  Focus on what your best at and what brings you the most profit.  Yes, focus on what got you started in your business in the first place. 

9. Minimize Distractions:  Distractions like the phone, internet, email, co-workers, daydreaming, etc., can and will work to thwart your plan. Make the necessary arrangements to keep these distractions to a minimum.

10. Additional Tips: Finally, here are a few final suggestions:

* First, make sure you take the appropriate time to speak with employees and co-workers, as well as time for returning phone calls, emails, etc. The key is to do these tasks when they are scheduled (much easier said than done, of course).

* Schedule several breaks during the day  – take “5-minute vacations” where you can walk outside or around the office, stretch and clear your mind to recharge your mental batteries and allow yourself to get re-focused on your work.

I challenge you to start today by implementing these techniques. If you learn to do them and do them well, you’ll be able to use some of that new found time for some much needed personal and family enjoyment.

What makes you special?

 

 

 

 

 

One of the first lessons in building a business is really a lesson that has to be continuously examined and almost relearned: what makes you special? How are you unique?

You need to work out what is special about you, and then make a big deal about it. And don’t just say ‘price’ or ‘quality’ – these are empty terms. Make it very specific, and meaningful.

How is that possible you ask? Well here’s an idea: every person and every individual is unique – you are unique, you are different, so focus not only on your product or service, but the unique aspects of your personality, who you are, what you stand for, and what you value.

Better yet – focus on the unique positive difference your product or service will make in the lives of your unique set of ideal clientele.

Need help defining what is unique about your business? Schedule a complimentary session with us!

Are You Running on Auto-Pilot?

Are you going through your life on auto-pilot?  Are you letting your reactions and responses to life’s circumstances and events be dictated by your previous values, attitudes, and beliefs…or are your responses a result of living in the present?

Most people tend to react (act again) as they go through life.  They react to other people’s conscious, or unconscious desire, or ability to “push” their buttons, or to situations without operating in the now moments of their lives. Their reactions find their origin in their learned attitudes, beliefs, expectations, prejudices, values or historically directed emotions. When we react from the history of our past, we take the risk of:

  • over-reacting
  • under-reacting
  • reacting inappropriately
  • reacting too quickly
  • reacting too slowly

Any of these responses to any set of circumstances or people are doomed to cause continued stress, anxiety, and continued, unresolved personal feelings.

When a person reacts without being totally conscious or thinking out of the now, they’ll often say or do things they’ll regret later.

Here are a few strategies to consider the next time you find yourself out of emotional control due to another person or an event.

  1. Take a quality pause, a brief 2-3 second break where you say to yourself – I do have a choice.  I can react the way I normally would have to this stimulus or I can react differently. With the quality pause you can get out of auto-pilot and into the present.
  2. Develop the habit of counting to 5, slowly, before you speak or act as a result of a stimulus.
  3. Give someone you are close to the permission to alert you (make you aware) each and every time you react without pausing or taking the time to think through your response.
  4. Create personal anchors (a personal reminder) that automatically kicks in every time you find yourself losing emotional control.  Thought-stoppers work well here. (What’s a thought-stopper? An example might be to place an elastic band around your wrist…one about a quarter of an inch wide…and each time you find yourself into negative thought, or losing emotional control…just pull the band back and let it go.  Whatever you were thinking about will be gone in a flash.

Living life out of auto-pilot is to live incompletely…to live the past.  To live in the present…the now…only requires that you become conscious every time you are functioning from memory, expectations, or in the future.

And that’s worth thinking about…

Have You Ever Had Conflict in the Workplace?

 

 

 

 

 

Conflict in the workplace and even at home is often inevitable. Conflict is generally a good thing. A difference of opinion inspires creativity and growth. Imagine if everyone was the same and agreed all the time. Life would be boring!

The big challenge is knowing how to deal with conflict when it arises to encourage a win:win outcome.

“Seeking first to understand and then be understood,” Stephen Covey 

Step 1:  The conflict resolution process consists of setting some guidelines for the discussion. Keep the discussion above the line by taking Ownership, Accountability, and Responsibility for their actions.

Getting commitment from each party to play above the line will stop the tendency to get into a blame or excuse situation.

Getting both parties to have both self-respect and respect for others is the next step.  Creating a Win:Win working environment is the only way that will give satisfactory results.  In an environment of both self-respect as well as respect for others, both parties are willing to listen to the other’s point of view and then respond in an assertive way.

Step 2: Now is the time to get them talking. The rules are simple…

Each person gets to speak in turn on what their side of the situation is by starting with the phrase, “What I feel like expressing is…” The other party cannot interrupt until the first person has finished speaking by saying “…and that’s what I feel like expressing.”

Then the other party is to repeat to the first what he/she understands their issue to be. Only once the second person has successfully understood the situation will the first person be able to have their turn to state their case.

This method of conflict resolution allows a creative resolution to even the most challenging of issues. As long as both parties are willing, there will usually be a successful outcome.

Self-sabotage: 7 Signs You Are Getting in the Way of your Sales Success

You can stop self-sabotaging yourself and begin to reach your sales goals. The first step is to simply become aware of what’s getting in your way. When you become aware of how you are getting in your own way, THEN, and only THEN, do you have the power to change it. Here are 7 things to consider:

  1. You are following your agenda rather than theirs. Take their lead, if answers to your questions go in another direction, follow it.
  2. You are getting objections. Objections mean you didn’t let them bring up an important point during the conversation, or you didn’t listen when they tried to get more details about an area.
  3. You are talking people OUT of buying. STOP talking, start listening, it can’t be any simpler than that.
  4. You are being asked for a resume or testimonials. This means you are selling yourself rather than solving their problems.
  5. You have a closing rate of less than 50% after they talk to you in person. Example: If they agree to see you after completing a questionnaire, a half hour on the phone and so much more, in their head they are at the VERY LEAST 50% of the way to having bought your service or product. All you have to do is let them show you why.
  6. You are losing clients within the first 3 to 6 months. There can be many reasons for this, but ultimately, it’s because they are NOT getting the results they THOUGHT they would. Dang, if they just read the books, came up with their own ideas and you insisted they worked harder every week, they would get results.
  7. You think your HEAD TRASH is real . I have to know more, I don’t have enough experience. I have to BE more. Goodness me, you don’t win a marathon by BE’ing more, you win by training more, running more and doing the hard work. Business success is about hard work- your hard work, your team’s hard work and your client’s hard work.

True, sometimes business is slow. That’s a time when self-sabotage can easily creep in. Don’t let it! Do yourself a favor and use this list in the most productive way… to STOP sabotaging your own sales success!